Louis Proyect: The Unrepentant Marxist

September 14, 2018

Icarus Film Retrospective

Filed under: Film — louisproyect @ 6:14 pm

Beginning tonight and lasting through the 30th, the Metrograph theater in New York will be featuring an Icarus film retrospective. Icarus is a distribution company whose leading-edge, radical films are generally not available on Amazon, iTunes or other popular streaming services. I have been covering Icarus films for close to decades now and can attest to their tremendous value as uncompromising artistic and political statements.

The Metrograph website introduces Icarus as follows:

In the summer of 1978, Ilan Ziv, fresh off his work helping to organize the first “Middle East Film Festival” in the United States, found himself in possession of a collection of little-seen films and of a passion to expose US audiences to the different points of view that they represented. Towards that end he created the distribution company Icarus Films, helmed since 1980 by Jonathan Miller. Now, forty years on, Icarus Films remains committed to the founders’ pluralistic, embracing vision of cinema, championing socially and artistically significant films that give voice to marginalized communities and express a vital, dissident version of history that’s not always written by the winners. Metrograph celebrates Icarus Films’ milestone birthday with a program of landmark films from South America, Africa, Europe, and points beyond, a program that includes crucial works by Chantal Akerman, Chris Marker, and the other epochal artists they’ve represented through the years.

Visit the Metrograph Box Office to purchase the Icarus Passport: a ticket to every program in the Icarus Films at 40 series for $50.

I am not sure when I began reviewing Icarus films but it was at least 11 years ago as this representative offering would indicate:

From my review (https://louisproyect.org/2007/05/19/six-days/):

The subtitle of “Six Days,” a documentary that opened yesterday at the Quad Cinema in New York, is “June 1967: The War that Changed the Middle East.” Directed by Israeli émigré Ilan Ziv, it generally follows the formula of PBS Frontline shows or the History Channel. Striving for a neutral approach that avoids any hint of editorializing until the final 20 minutes, it concludes with a devastating look at the impact of Israel’s blitzkrieg victory in 1967–leaving no doubt about the director’s progressive intentions.

Ziv was the founder of Icarus Films in New York City, which later merged with First Run, another like-minded distribution company. Over the years I have reviewed a number of their excellent films, including most recently “The Angry Monk,” a film about Tibet that debunks the “spiritualist” hype associated with the Dalai Lama. Ziv stepped down from Icarus in 1980 in order to devote himself full-time to documentary film making. To give you a sense of where he is coming from politically, he made “Shrine Under Siege” in 1985, an attack on Jewish and Christian fundamentalist efforts to destroy the Dome of the Rock, Islam’s third holiest shrine, and to build a new Jewish temple in its place.

By June 1967, I had become radicalized by the war in Vietnam and was rethinking everything I had believed in the past, including Israel’s progressive reputation. Ziv’s film is an excellent reminder of why so many young Jews began to break with Zionism. It makes absolutely clear that despite Zionist propaganda Israel was the dominant power in the Middle East capable of reducing its neighbors to rubble.

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