Louis Proyect: The Unrepentant Marxist

January 4, 2018

The Iranian People’s Uprising

Filed under: Iran — louisproyect @ 12:28 am

Iranian People Rise Again
By Reza Fiyouzat

Starting on Thursday December 28, spontaneous demonstrations broke out in different towns and cities across Iran. The protests broke out over economic issues such as high inflation and high youth unemployment, with the trigger being the sudden hike in price of eggs and chicken. The protesters, however, soon took up more politically oriented slogans, attacking the leaders of the regime with slogans such as, “People are begging and Mullahs rule like they’re gods!”

Regardless of how long these protests last and what the outcomes may be, these protests have proven once again that the Iranian regime is fundamentally incapable of addressing people’s most basic social and economic needs, and that is why for forty years it has depended on brute force to control the population. But, rule by brute force alone cannot last forever.

Deep-structure poverty has once again pushed the population over the edge. This uprising did not just happen out of the blue, though; it is the culmination of many smaller and more localized protests over a variety of social issues that have sent people to the streets in the past year.

But, first let’s see what has pushed people in Iran to take to the street once again, on a mass scale, across the country, in big cities just as in small towns; towns that most western readers have never heard of, nor will ever remember.

Continue reading

35 Comments »

  1. The arguments I read of CIA plots are rather amazing. To imagine they have such omipresent power. That people will shout a ready made script handed to them by operatives. That robots will pour out into streets on command. That a centralised organisational structure will direct them nation wide. It’s all part of a plan, afterall. If these conspiratorial minded people really understood the limits of power, how little the CIA or anyone else can control what is, in essence, an anarchic situation, Then maybe they would be less frightened themselves, giving authority more power than they really deserve…

    Comment by seaspan — January 4, 2018 @ 8:21 pm

  2. Is this what ping back is:
    https://theconversation.com/iran-a-new-kind-of-protest-movement-is-taking-hold-89589

    Comment by Curt Kastens — January 4, 2018 @ 9:01 pm

  3. So who is making “arguments” about CIA plots? References please. Or is this just the usual straw man characterization of the “anti-imperialist left” found on this blog?

    Here is a sensible exchange from Democracy Now:

    AMY GOODMAN: And what about involvement of perhaps the CIA, U.S. government, other Western governments? I mean, the U.S. very close right now to Saudi Arabia, an enemy of Iran. And the reason to raise the issue of the CIA, of course, in people’s minds in Iran, much more than the United States, is going back to the history of 1953 and the CIA overthrow, the U.S. government overthrow, of the democratically elected Iranian leader, Mohammad Mosaddegh.
    TRITA PARSI: This is, of course, a very sensitive point, precisely because of the history that you mention. And we have to be very frank: We don’t know. What we do know is that the people do have legitimate grievances because of both political, social and economic injustices in Iran. That, in and of itself, does not mean, however, that there may not be either attempts by outsiders to influence this or try to hijack it.
    But I think it’s also interesting to see how the Rouhani government handled it. Whereas hardliners were rather quick to try to blame the whole thing on outside interference and saying that the protesters are in collusion with foreign agents, the Rouhani government came out and said that most people that are protesting are protesting because they’re angry, because they have legitimate frustrations. Some may be doing so because they’re under the influence of foreign agents. And I think they did so because they understand that they would be inciting more protest if they were to insult the protesters by essentially dismissing their grievances. Instead, they accepted that they have legitimate grievances, in an effort to try to calm down the situation.
    JUAN GONZÁLEZ: And, Trita, I wanted to ask you, in terms of your assessment—you mentioned President Rouhani. Your assessment of President Rouhani? Because Iran is a nation that is unusual in that it has this clerical hierarchy that wields such immense power, yet it has a vibrant democracy, where the people, in their elections, often don’t go along with the clerical hierarchy.
    TRITA PARSI: Certainly not. And I think it’s quite interesting to see that those who the hardliners have been endorsing or are believed to be backing have almost always lost in these elections. These elections are not fully democratic, of course, because there’s a Guardian Council that vets candidates in a rather undemocratic way, so not anyone who wants to run can run. But within the limited choices, it tends to be quite competitive, certainly quite decisive. And as Reza pointed out, the voter participation has been quite high, about 70 percent last time. So there is a civil rights movement. There is a very strong civil society in Iran that has really internalized democratic values.
    But what we’re seeing right now is actually protesters from a different demographic who seem to believe that they have nothing to lose, don’t seem to buy into the idea that the system can be changed from within, but instead are so frustrated that they are now calling for the system to be overthrown altogether.

    Comment by David Green — January 5, 2018 @ 3:46 am

  4. David Green,

    Like, suddenly that ideologically constipated weasel, Trita Parsi is some ultimate decider on what we’re supposed to take for fact?

    Do you assume just because you quote another Eye-rainian, we’re all gonna be like, “Oh, Wow! What disarming logic! Well, sure, Sir, there’s only two Eye-rainians in this world and when that Trita Parsi man speaks, that’s the one to follow! Yes, Sirreee!”

    Do you know where Iran is politico-historically? Do you know what a historical map is? Where are you in it, in relation to Iran? You’re in the theocratic circle; pre-enlightenment. You are the jihadi, David Green.

    You just happened to be passing through our neighborhood while stopping to take a piss, you asshole. Keep stepping and proceed with loving yourself.

    Comment by Reza — January 5, 2018 @ 5:43 am

  5. So who is making “arguments” about CIA plots?

    Robert Fisk, for one:

    http://www.independent.co.uk/voices/iran-protests-donald-trump-michael-dandrea-us-opposition-hassan-rouhani-reform-violence-riots-a8141271.html

    Comment by louisproyect — January 5, 2018 @ 2:14 pm

  6. Reza, you might try getting a grip at some point. Or, true to form, you can keep presenting yourself as a complete asshole.

    Comment by David Green — January 5, 2018 @ 3:50 pm

  7. And for whom does Robert Fisk speak?

    Comment by David Green — January 5, 2018 @ 3:52 pm

  8. Green, you asked who thought that the Iran protests were a CIA plot and I answered you. Now, you ask for whom Fisk speaks. The answer is the same people who take Patrick Cockburn, Seymour Hersh, Gareth Porter, Patrick Lawrence and Robert Parry seriously. In other words, people just like you.

    Comment by louisproyect — January 5, 2018 @ 3:55 pm

  9. Iran is a classic instance illustrating how anti-imperialism is not necessarily left in character. Anti-imperialism can be found across the political spectrum, ranging from libertarians to communists. It is a tent big enough to hold them all.

    There is plenty of information out there, even in the English language, about the repression of workers by the Iranian government. Yet there are some on the left, along with other anti-imperialists, who insist that we either support the government against an effort that could benefit the US by overthrowing or weakening it (note, reflexive supporters of the government have learned something since 2009, when they invoked CIA/Mossad conspiracy theories more openly) or advise that we tread carefully, because we don’t really know what the protests are about.

    This latter line is new, and suggests that defenders of the government have recognized that their past refusal to accept the possibility that people in Iran may have legitimate grievances is no longer viable.

    The left, whether social democratic, Marxist-Leninist or anarchist, should stand with the working class. Aligning oneself with governments that geopolitically oppose the US while suppressing their workers internally is an abandonment of this responsibility.

    Comment by Richard Estes — January 5, 2018 @ 8:24 pm

  10. David Green,
    Who is making the argument of a CIA plot with these recent demonstrations?, The clerical leadership of Iran, primarily. Secondarily, amplified and disseminated by the usual suspects in western countries. I understand why Iran’s lreadership does it: to spread fear and confusion about protesters, a clear warning not to join them. With Rouhani spreading the same fear and confusion but speaking to some unknown part of the protesters who he insinuates are infiltrated, being manipulated and duped by same western agents. Confirmed and corroborated, it must be true. However, it is the State that has the means and motivation to infiltrate protesters, to guide them toward violence, and it is their interest to do so, exactly to accuse them of being western agents. Why would they leave it to the US, which has no Embassy, consulates, no “nest of spies”? In any case, even if there is a place in-country in which they can nest and rest, CIA historical competence is based on propping up existing govts against a restive population, OR weakening, overtrhowing a govt through their disloyal military. They dont waste their time getting involved in civil unrest, uprisings or revolutions, for the very reason they are chaotic and uncontrollable. The most they can do is watch it and report on it, identify leaders and their potential to be co-opted to US interests.

    Okay it is possible to start from scratch, to fund, train and arm nationals (whereever they may be), who are willing and able, and against both the govt and military. Extremely difficult. And PressTV is blaring on their site that a MKO cell has been broken up, caught infiltrating the country from the outside, in some isolated desert region far far away from any witnesses. And it is suggested they have something to do with the protesters, its violent turn, and etc. Certainly, that adds to the fear and confusion as the govt suddenly and very conveniently can say the MKO is involved. Nobody knows how many, nobody has seen them, nobody questions how they have anything to do with the protesters, Even if this alleged bust is true. Democracy Now, Fisk, arent investigating, asking these types of questions, or even reporting this news, They simply parrot the rumours and suspicions of western agents, citing 1953 as evidence, While giving the clerics a priori credibility…

    Here is an Analysis Paper by the Brookings Institute, on the possibilities and limitations of US involvement in a theorectical Iranian revolution (p101-p121). It lays it out straight away: forget starting a Revolution from the outside, it’s never been done (although they do mention Lenin being secreted into Russia from Germany). And Iran is even more difficult because there is no US Embassy to base such a plot, Furthermore, Iran is a highly developed surveillance, militarised Police State. It goes on about the possibilities given the limitations, and I recommend you read it. It is, afterall, paid for by your tax dollars, budgeted under supposed CIA covert ops in Iran.

    https://www.brookings.edu/wp-content/uploads/2016/06/06_iran_strategy.pdf

    Comment by seaspan — January 5, 2018 @ 10:42 pm

  11. seaspan,

    All valid points. However, as you may have implied, this whole “CIA made it happen” bullshit is just a red herring. First off, it portrays CIA as some fantastical institution with unlimited powers that can just wish any scenario into existence. If CIA or the U.S. government were that omnipotent, and if they really intend to “change the regime” there, why haven’t they exercised all these magical powers to overthrow the regime for forty years? There is no internal logic there.

    Second, people forget (or just don’t know, or just don’t want to learn by reading a few books on Iranian history before speaking about Iran with such self-assumed authority) — anyway, that infamous 1953 CIA coup was successful because the clerical classes at that point provided the foot soldiers to carry through the coup to ‘success’. Without their foot soldiers, it would not have succeeded. It is really infuriating for an Iranian like me to have to listen to western “leftists” repeating this 1953 coup business (without knowing its real history) to defend a theocracy’s line about CIA being at it again, when these exact mullahs helped the coup that overthrew Mossadeqh.

    But to expect some western leftists to know details of Iranian history before they attempt to provide any analyses, well, it is futile. Some people just think they know everything. Thank God the western left is not under the total monopoly of the clueless “anti-imperialists” who end up supporting mass murderers. Cheers to them who have basic social justice sense and represent the kind of socialism we should be working towards, a socialism that cherishes the sense of solidarity with struggling people.

    Third, this line of “CIA done it” tries to sidestep all the real social and economic pressures that have sent people out onto the streets for hundreds of years, all over the world. Why would the pressures of extreme poverty, excessive unemployment, deeply set corruption, huge inflation, the necessity to work two to three jobs to make ends meet, the increase in the sale of body organs to make ends meet, the increase in prostitution to make ends meet, the unprecedented opium, heroin and crack addictions (nearly ten million, meaning one in eight of the population), and on top of it an extremely violent state apparatus that injects itself into your life daily with religious severity to tell you how to behave, and that is into *every* personal and private activity, much more so as relates to your public actions, and on and on … Why would people NOT revolt against such a monstrosity suffocating them? You’d have to be dead to not rebel.

    Comment by Reza — January 5, 2018 @ 11:36 pm

  12. I’m entirely with you Reza. Thanks.

    Comment by seaspan — January 5, 2018 @ 11:43 pm

  13. “Green, you asked who thought that the Iran protests were a CIA plot and I answered you. Now, you ask for whom Fisk speaks. The answer is the same people who take Patrick Cockburn, Seymour Hersh, Gareth Porter, Patrick Lawrence and Robert Parry seriously. In other words, people just like you.”

    Louis, the point is you lump people together on flimsy evidence, and then you totalize their views about Iran. So read Patrick Cockburn’s column today on Counterpunch and then reconsider. And give people the consideration of not seeing them as one-dimensional in order to suit your stereotypical view of them. It’s getting really old, and really transparently stupid.

    Comment by David Green — January 6, 2018 @ 12:31 am

  14. Once again, Reza, who is seriously offering this line that the “CIA done it.” Don’t say Global Research, I don’t care, that doesn’t make the case about Trita Parsi etc. And what did he do to set you off? You’re just a very bitter human being; perhaps that’s understandable, but at least be honest about it.

    Comment by David Green — January 6, 2018 @ 12:33 am

  15. @Richard Estes: Thanks for contributing in building the straw person “left”, as usual without really naming anyone, as if you’re the only one who understands that the world is complicated. In general, what a pathetic excuse for a serious discussion about Iran, not mention the apologies for U.S. imperialism, which continues to be a rather real phenomenon.

    Comment by David Green — January 6, 2018 @ 4:45 am

  16. As an addendum,,, I dont pretend to know or understand Iran, the internal opposition, official or otherwise. The class breakdown, urban/rural, youth, poor, working class, campesinos. Present or past dynamics. I have only a cursory knowledge of its history. And I know next to nothing of the MKO, except I remember rooting for them as the mujahadeen, before the crack down and consolidation of the clerics. The revolution happened very quickly from my perspective, and news of a counter revolution was sporadic at best — not through our media but, in my case, through fleeting conversations with Iranians at a University my wife was attending. There really wasnt much news about it — except through the US lens: Iran/contra, the Iraq war, and the publicised general hostility. And I say “publicised” because there was always the suspicion that US/Iran relations werent all that we were being told, since we’d occasionally hear of back channel communication and even cooperation — and now in Iraq it’s quite overt. So I’ve always wondered whether the whole idea of hostility is misleading, that we are led to assume it. As Reza says, they’ve had 40 years to do something and, besides the rhetoric, there seems to be a settled cozy status quo. A real mystery. So while I can talk somewhat about the CIA, their capabilities and limitations (I’ve seen them operate in the 1990s in a low intensity conflict zone where I reside), regarding Iran I have no idea what they are really doing or why…

    Comment by seaspan — January 6, 2018 @ 6:21 am

  17. “@Richard Estes: Thanks for contributing in building the straw person “left”, as usual without really naming anyone, as if you’re the only one who understands that the world is complicated. In general, what a pathetic excuse for a serious discussion about Iran, not mention the apologies for U.S. imperialism, which continues to be a rather real phenomenon.”

    Woodward and Bernstein had a term for this in “All the President’s Men”: a “non-denial denial.”

    The government’s repression of the Iranian working class is open and notorious. Do you have anything to say about it? So far, you’ve been silent.

    Comment by Richard Estes — January 6, 2018 @ 10:54 pm

  18. Richard, I posted comments by Parsi, who has been clear about the internal issues. I referred to Patrick Cockburn’s article on Counterpunch. What on earth would make you think that I’m not aware of the oppression of the working class in Iran or any other country? My point here is that you set up a straw man, including me, who allegedly indulges in conspiracy theories about the protests. I have no expertise to add about such oppression in Iran, I wouldn’t be so pretentious, but I obviously wouldn’t deny it, that would be ridiculous. You are engaging with a fictional entity invented on this blog, the “anti-imperialist left.” My comments address those like you, who claim with no evidence that those who focus on USFP and its very real depredations are conspiracy theorists who do deny the economic dynamics in Iran. But perhaps that’s too complicated for you to understand. Not everyone is a one-dimensional thinker like you.

    Comment by David Green — January 7, 2018 @ 12:07 am

  19. “Second, people forget (or just don’t know, or just don’t want to learn by reading a few books on Iranian history before speaking about Iran with such self-assumed authority) — anyway, that infamous 1953 CIA coup was successful because the clerical classes at that point provided the foot soldiers to carry through the coup to ‘success’. Without their foot soldiers, it would not have succeeded. It is really infuriating for an Iranian like me to have to listen to western “leftists” repeating this 1953 coup business (without knowing its real history) to defend a theocracy’s line about CIA being at it again, when these exact mullahs helped the coup that overthrew Mossadeqh.”

    Right Reza, the U.S. and British intelligence services were not absolutely vital to the coup.

    And you expect to be taken seriously.

    Comment by David Green — January 7, 2018 @ 12:13 am

  20. David: this is what I said.

    “There is plenty of information out there, even in the English language, about the repression of workers by the Iranian government. Yet there are some on the left, along with other anti-imperialists, who insist that we either support the government against an effort that could benefit the US by overthrowing or weakening it (note, reflexive supporters of the government have learned something since 2009, when they invoked CIA/Mossad conspiracy theories more openly) or advise that we tread carefully, because we don’t really know what the protests are about.”

    About half an hour spent on social media will result in numerous examples.

    Comment by Richard Estes — January 7, 2018 @ 2:21 am

  21. Richard, you’re really invoking “social media” to make your case against “some on the left.” That’s as specific as you can get? Richard, you’re preposterous in making a generalization of any kind about “the left.” You can even look at Jacobin, Louis’s favorite website, to find a well-detailed article from on the ground. So please, just stop making such a fool out of yourself unless you can come up with some actual specific evidence upon which you can generalize about “the left” (rather than “some on the left”, not that you can even come up with the data to do even that). Richard, you’ve got nothing, just like this whole past and discussion has got nothing. It’s not even a thing, it’s just a few desperate people wanting to feel superior to “some on the left.” It’s pathetic.

    Comment by David Green — January 7, 2018 @ 3:08 am

  22. Green, you asked me who takes Fisk seriously and I answered the same people that take Patrick Cockburn et al seriously. This does not mean that Fisk and Cockburn are saying the same thing about the Iran protests at this point. Keep in mind that most on the left, including Fisk and Cockburn, welcomed the Syrian revolt in the early months but when the rebels started getting arms from Saudi Arabia and the USA, the original supporters all became disgusting Assadists just like you. It is too soon to say whether an armed struggle will develop in Iran. As Juan Cole pointed out, the mass arrests might have broken the back of the protests. But you can be sure if a revolutionary struggle develops, the support for the regime will solidify. It would actually be in the best interests of the working class that the regime does not precipitate an armed struggle after the fashion of Assad who dispatched snipers to kill peaceful protesters. Another difference from Syria is that the regime cannot play the sectarian card since the protesters are Shia as well. This will be much more of a clear class struggle than in Syria. Finally, here are links to the more stupidly “anti-imperialist” articles that are in sync with Robert Fisk’s nonsense:

    1. Caitlin Johnstone: http://www.informationclearinghouse.info/48522.htm
    2. Peter Koenig: https://dissidentvoice.org/2018/01/iran-at-dangerous-crossroads/
    3. Moon of Alabama: http://www.moonofalabama.org/2017/12/iran-early-us-support-for-rioters-hints-at-a-larger-plan.html
    4. Max Blumenthal: https://twitter.com/MaxBlumenthal/status/947950679657721857
    5. Party for Socialism and Liberation: https://www.liberationnews.org/what-to-make-of-irans-demonstrations/
    6. Ron Paul: https://www.antiwar.com/blog/2018/01/02/ron-paul-on-iran-protests-cia-fingerprints/
    7. Stephen Lendman: http://stephenlendman.org/2018/01/foreign-intervention-behind-iran-protests/
    8. Phil Wilayto: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4zSze1DNov4

    Comment by louisproyect — January 7, 2018 @ 4:09 pm

  23. Louis, try to hold two thoughts at the same time if you’re capable. People are rightly vigilant about
    American interventionism, ongoing. And many of those same people understand corruption and class struggle and neoliberalism in Iran. They don’t all wear black hats. Among the above, Blumenthal and Johnstone have been judicious voices, Blumenthal of course being slandered by you consistently. The rest are a motley collection that you use to generalize about the “anti-imperialist left” and “Assadists,” whom I do not follow for good reason, and whom you follow only to confirm your ridiculous generalizations. Your act is very thin and transparent. It’s appalling that you have become at the same time an apologist for and denier of U.S. interventionism, and that your blog becomes a collection of “anti-Assadist” one-notes. And by the way, why isn’t Black Agenda Report listed above? And when are you going to put Glen Ford’s head on the body of a cockroach? Come on Louis, let’s see it; stop picking only on white boys, it makes you look like a bully and a coward.

    Comment by David Green — January 7, 2018 @ 4:41 pm

  24. Among the above, Blumenthal and Johnstone have been judicious voices, Blumenthal of course being slandered by you consistently.

    I laughed so hard reading this that the ginger ale I was drinking squirted out of my nose.

    Comment by louisproyect — January 7, 2018 @ 4:45 pm

  25. Louis, you do not deserve the respect of judicious people.

    Comment by David Green — January 7, 2018 @ 4:53 pm

  26. There has not been an uprising or a revolution in the past two hundred years in which some foreign power or other has not intervened, trying to fish in muddy waters. One famous one in the Western Hemisphere was American intervention in the Cuban War of Independence. At that point, would you have advised against Cubans wishing to gain independence from Spain just because the U.S. got involved? The intervention of powerful states is a GIVEN. So, what’s you point Green? That nobody should do anything about suffocating social conditions just because some foreign powers are going to get involved?

    People who’ve had enough will take to the streets whether there is funny business going on by powerful foreign states or not. Do you think if there is a big mass movement here in the U.S., Russia or others will not intervene to take advantage? At that point, what will you do? Sit on the sidelines because the ‘purity’ of the movement has been compromised? You live in fantasy land.

    The question for leftists is simple: Will you also intervene as a leftist, but on behalf of the people, in support of the people; will you show solidarity with struggling people, or will you side with people’s oppressors?

    That’s the question; far too many leftists (in recent years) have sided with the oppressors. You seem to be one such “leftist”, all full of caution and hand wringing about people’s protests, and full of excuses to not support them.

    Comment by Reza — January 7, 2018 @ 5:44 pm

  27. Might as well add InfoWars to the clerics’ list. Do they say the CIA are the instigators of protests? Not quite. They say it is George Soros. The political debate now crystalises around whether it is Michael D’Andrea or George. It’s like flipping a coin…

    And let’s completely forget this reported chant: “Leave Syria, think about us!”

    Comment by seaspan — January 7, 2018 @ 6:49 pm

  28. The most thorough and judicious comment on Iran I have found can be found below. Of course, it never would
    have made the cut on this blog, with so many sharp and stupid axes to grind:

    https://www.liberationnews.org/what-to-make-of-irans-demonstrations/?utm_source=facebook&utm_medium=shared_article&utm_campaign=Liberation%20News

    Comment by David Green — January 7, 2018 @ 10:06 pm

  29. @ Reza; it doesn’t make a rat’s ass worth of difference if I or anyone like Louis supports the Iranian resistance; we can make a difference if we refuse to support U.S. imperialism in the region. I don’t think that that should be hard for even you to understand.

    Comment by David Green — January 7, 2018 @ 10:08 pm

  30. @ Louis; you ought to check out your own comments about fascism, which I found helpful. I understand that Johnstone is not to Jeffrey’s taste, and certainly Cobb isn’t to mine, two different animals. I’m not a Johnstone fan either, but there’s no reason to demonize her. The idea that the left shouldn’t work with anti-imperialists to oppose American interventionism is just sectarianism at its worst. And you claim to want to support resistance movements in other countries.

    Comment by David Green — January 7, 2018 @ 10:12 pm

  31. Green, are you really so fucking stupid to post a link to the PSL here as “impartial”? This filthy sect has the nerve to compare the protesters to the people who voted for Trump. The author writes, “A movement whose most popular demand is opposition to Iran’s support for Palestine cannot be progressive.” That’s true but Iran does not “support” Palestine unless you are talking about the words out of some jackass cleric’s mouth. Iran props up the war criminal Assad who has the blood of 3400 Palestinians on his hands since 2011.

    Comment by louisproyect — January 7, 2018 @ 10:16 pm

  32. Green,

    You’re a really sneaky snake. Just say if you do or don’t support Iranian people’s struggle. That’s not so difficult, is it? II am sure you have no problem supporting Palestinians. Does it make a rat’s ass worth of difference when you support Palestinians or any other struggling people? But, you still do it, right? Or maybe you are just as aloof towards all people struggling to gain their dignity and social justice?

    Yes, you are right to oppose American intervention in Iran (or anywhere else). Like that is something I would argue against. But, why do you think that your opposition would make a rat’s ass worth of difference? Did millions of people opposing U.S. invasion of Iraq make a difference? Of course not. But you do your political work anyway.

    Also, do you oppose U.S. government intervention, so as to keep the current regime in Iran? Or, do you oppose U.S. intervention so that people’s struggle will be successful? Which one is it?

    The difference it makes is what kind of human being YOU are. Right not you are just a prevaricator.

    Comment by Reza — January 7, 2018 @ 10:35 pm

  33. “I’m not a Johnstone fan either, but there’s no reason to demonize her. The idea that the left shouldn’t work with anti-imperialists to oppose American interventionism is just sectarianism at its worst.”

    No, can’t imagine demonizing a woman who wants to work with fascists like Mike Cernovich. But this does prove my initial point in my first comment. Anti-imperialism isn’t leftism, and the willingness of some anti-imperialists to work with Cernovich proves it. The working class is not a priority for them, in fact, anti-imperialism is a big enough tent to accept people actively hostile to it, like Cernovich.

    Comment by Richard Estes — January 8, 2018 @ 6:29 pm


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