Louis Proyect: The Unrepentant Marxist

October 6, 2015

Anti-Imperialism 2.0: Selective Sympathies, Dubious Friends

Filed under: Uncategorized — louisproyect @ 12:57 am

P U L S E

by Charles Davis

The new imperialism is caring a bit too much about the suffering of people who are being brutalized by a regime which is not currently an ally of the United States – and the new anti-imperialism is not giving a damn at all, solidarity that extends beyond the border permissible only if the drawing of attention to their plight could not possibly be used as ammunition by the “humanitarian” militarists of the American empire. The world, in this view, is divided into but two camps: those with America and those against it, with the good anti-imperialist’s outrage dialed up if the atrocity can be linked to the United States, as well it should be, but dialed down to total silence if it’s not.

This is, of course, the “anti-imperialism” of the reactionary, in more than one sense: How a person of the left responds to a…

View original post 4,288 more words

4 Comments »

  1. Take up the White Man’s burden—

    Send forth the best ye breed—

    Go send your sons to exile

    To serve your captives’ need

    To wait in heavy harness

    On fluttered folk and wild—

    Your new-caught, sullen peoples,

    Half devil and half child

    Take up the White Man’s burden

    In patience to abide

    To veil the threat of terror

    And check the show of pride;

    By open speech and simple

    An hundred times made plain

    To seek another’s profit

    And work another’s gain

    Take up the White Man’s burden—

    And reap his old reward:

    The blame of those ye better

    The hate of those ye guard—

    The cry of hosts ye humour

    (Ah slowly) to the light:

    “Why brought ye us from bondage,

    “Our loved Egyptian night?”

    Take up the White Man’s burden-

    Have done with childish days-

    The lightly proffered laurel,

    The easy, ungrudged praise.

    Comes now, to search your manhood

    Through all the thankless years,

    Cold-edged with dear-bought wisdom,

    The judgment of your peers!

    Source: Rudyard Kipling, “The White Man’s Burden: The United States & The Philippine Islands, 1899.” Rudyard Kipling’s Verse: Definitive Edition (Garden City, New York: Doubleday, 1929).

    http://historymatters.gmu.edu/d/5478/

    Comment by Noram — October 6, 2015 @ 7:57 am

  2. Norman, Noram, or Nomra…I understand that you think I am Christopher Hitchens. And you probably understand that I think you are Anna Louise Strong. Now that we have established what we think of each other, maybe you can write something more substantive next time–like an analysis of Syrian society or something like that. If your only interest is trolling, you will have a short shelf life here.

    Comment by louisproyect — October 6, 2015 @ 12:21 pm

  3. “I understand that you think I am Christopher Hitchens.”

    You flatter yourself. A propagandist for reaction Hitchens may have been, but at least he had the excuse that was well rewarded materially for his services. You, on the other hand, appear desperate to offer up your shrill propaganda services gratis. That is, unlike Hitchens, you are either a chump, or your efforts are of such transparently low and unconvincing quality that the bourgeois establishment sees no value in offering you any status in return.

    Comment by Noram — October 7, 2015 @ 11:09 am

  4. You hurt my feelings. Boo-hoo.

    Comment by louisproyect — October 7, 2015 @ 11:56 am


RSS feed for comments on this post. TrackBack URI

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Blog at WordPress.com.

%d bloggers like this: