Louis Proyect: The Unrepentant Marxist

April 10, 2015

Slave Rebellions on the Open Seas

Filed under: Counterpunch,slavery — louisproyect @ 4:27 pm
Slave Rebellions on the Open Seas

The Black Struggle Against Slavery

by LOUIS PROYECT

Greg Grandin’s “The Empire of Necessity: Slavery, Freedom and Deception in the New World” and Marcus Rediker’s “The Amistad Rebellion: An Atlantic Odyssey of Slavery and Freedom” share both subject matter—slave rebellions on the open seas—and an unabashed commitment to the Black freedom struggle. Beyond the fortuitous combination of topic and political passion, however, the greatest reward for any reader is how both authors make history come alive. Despite their remoteness in time and place, the stories they tell have an obvious affinity for the Black struggle today as a new civil rights struggle takes shape to secure the final victory sought by ancestors Babo and Cinque.

“The Empire of Necessity: Slavery, Freedom and Deception in the New World” is an exploration of the events that inspired Herman Melville’s “Benito Cereno”, an 1855 novella about the ruse orchestrated by slaves fifty years earlier to convince Captain Amasa Delano, a distant relative of FDR, that their vessel remained under their ex-master’s sway. This excerpt from Melville should give you a flavor of this droll and macabre tale:

Three black boys, with two Spanish boys, were sitting together on the hatches, scraping a rude wooden platter, in which some scanty mess had recently been cooked. Suddenly, one of the black boys, enraged at a word dropped by one of his white companions, seized a knife, and though called to forbear by one of the oakum-pickers, struck the lad over the head, inflicting a gash from which blood flowed.

In amazement, Captain Delano inquired what this meant. To which the pale Benito dully muttered, that it was merely the sport of the lad.

“Pretty serious sport, truly,” rejoined Captain Delano. “Had such a thing happened on board the Bachelor’s Delight, instant punishment would have followed.”

At these words the Spaniard turned upon the American one of his sudden, staring, half-lunatic looks; then, relapsing into his torpor, answered, “Doubtless, doubtless, Senor.”

If Grandin’s history is a fitting counterpart to Melville’s fiction, a work of high culture for the ages, we can see “The Amistad Rebellion: An Atlantic Odyssey of Slavery and Freedom” as a necessary corrective to Stephen Spielberg’s pop culture film that like his “Lincoln” told a tale of paternalistic white intervention when the real history would have revealed something much more like self-emancipation.

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3 Comments »

  1. For an emotionally overwhelming presentation of black rebellion against the transatlantic slave trade, Rediker’s “The Slave Ship” is extraordinary. His examination of how Africans often rebelled through suicide, and the perverse success of this effort, will literally bring tears to the eyes. Slave ship captain efforts to deter it are a stark example of how mercantilism and capitalism induced people to implement the most callous forms of dehumanization.

    Comment by Richard Estes — April 10, 2015 @ 10:38 pm

  2. “a tale of paternalistic white intervention when the real history would have revealed something much more like self-emancipation.”
    It’s more a dialectic: it was news of the Emancipation Proclamation, as well as the crossing of state lines by the Union Army, which inspired the slaves to once and for all stop work on the plantations and revolt, clinching the victory against slavery. The Emancipation Proclamation could have liberated all slaves in the Union as well as those in Confederate states, and the Union Army could have simply descended on the plantations and expropriated the plantation class, but Lincoln was far too timid and opportunistic for this; nevertheless, the meager reforms and military injunctions he made were the impetus and inspiration for the full-scale self-emancipation of which you speak.

    Comment by Reinhold — April 11, 2015 @ 3:23 am


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